IN-&-OUT Breathing

There is this case where a monk, having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building sites down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect, and setting mindfulness to the fore.  Always mindful, he breathes in : mindful he breathes out.

1  Breathing in long, he discerns that he is breathing in long; or breathing out long, he discerns that he is breathing out long.

2  Or breathing in short, he discerns that he is breathing in short; or breathing out short, he discerns that he is breathing out short.

3  He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to the entire body, and to breathe out sensitive to the entire body.

4  He trains himself to breathe out sensitive to the entire body.

5  He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to rapture, and to breathe out sensitive to rapture.

6  He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to pleasure, and to breathe out sensitive to pleaseure.

7  He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to pleasure, and to breathe out sensitivie to pleasure.

8  He trains himself to breathe in calming mental fabrication, and to breathe out sensitive to fabrication.

9 He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to the mind, and to breathe out sensitive to the mind.

10  He trains himself to breathe in satisfying the mind, and to breathe out satisfying the mind.

11  He trains himself to breathe in steadying the mind, and to breathe out steadying the mind.

12  He trains himself to br3eathe in releasing the mind, and to breathe out releasing the mind.

13  He trains himself to breathe in focusing on inconsistancey, and to breathe out focusing on inconsistancey.

14 He trains himself to breathe in focusing on cessation, and to breathe out focusing on cessation.

15  He trains himself to breathe in focusing on cessation, and to breathe out focusing on cessationl.

16  He trains himself to breathe in focusing on relinquishment, and to breathe out focusing on relinquishment.

This is how mindfulness of IN-&-OUT breathing is developed & pursued so that it bears fruit & great benefits.

Extracted from:
the Wings to Awakening
An Anthology from the Pali Canon
Translated and Explained by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu
(Geoffrey DeGraff)
1996

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