Jon Kabat-Zinn: Coming to Our Senses

2 Jon Kabat Zinn: Coming to Our SensesRenowned mindfulness meditation teacher and best-selling author Jon Kabat-Zinn speaks at UCSD Medical Center on the topic of “Coming to Our Senses”, which is also the name of his new book, subtitled “Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness”. A pioneer in the application of ancient Buddhist practices to healing in modern medical settings, Kabat-Zinn expounds upon the value of “resting in awareness” not only to facilitate clarity in ourselves, but also as a means of relating to and healing the “dis-ease” in politics, society and the world. Series: “Health Sciences Journal” [11/1999] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 9375]

Duration : 0:57:21

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LAY GNOSIS for Buddhist Intellectuals

2 LAY GNOSIS for Buddhist IntellectualsLAY GNOSIS enhances the daily life with physical mood elevation to improve ones enjoyment of Buddhist practices. Takes only 20 mins to trigger. Proven in 10 countries. www.truebluehealer.com/Beginners.html

Duration : 0:6:31

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Meditation: a Buddhist Introduction

2 Meditation:  a Buddhist Introductionby Janet Baird, through Professor Rev. Dr. James Kenneth Powell II, opensourcebuddhism.org This project examines in a brief and cursory way the principal goal of meditation, various practices used to engender that state and places the practice firmly within the context of Buddhist practice.

Duration : 0:9:41

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Buddhism in Indonesia

2 Buddhism in Indonesiaby Sarah Riser through Professor Rev. Dr. James K. Powell II, opensourcebuddhism.org
This very well-made piece offers a chronology of the advent and exit (more or less) of Buddhism in Indonesia. From the Sailendra Dyanasty, Borobudur and on, various islands in Indonesia once housed a vast array of Buddhist practices and educational institutions.

Duration : 0:9:46

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Buddhism in America Documentary: CPD Guide to Religions (2000)

2 Buddhism in America Documentary: CPD Guide to Religions (2000)2000 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0664233201?ie=UTF8&tag=doc06-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0664233201 Watch the full film: http://thefilmarchived.blogspot.com/2010/10/guide-to-religions-in-america-chicago.html

Buddhism is a religion and philosophy encompassing a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices, largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, commonly known as the Buddha (Pāli/Sanskrit “the awakened one”). The Buddha lived and taught in the northeastern Indian subcontinent some time between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE. He is recognized by adherents as an awakened teacher who shared his insights to help sentient beings end suffering (or dukkha), achieve nirvana, and escape what is seen as a cycle of suffering and rebirth.

Two major branches of Buddhism are recognized: Theravada (“The School of the Elders”) and Mahayana (“The Great Vehicle”). Theravada—the oldest surviving branch—has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, and Mahayana is found throughout East Asia and includes the traditions of Pure Land, Zen, Nichiren Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, Shingon, Tendai and Shinnyo-en. In some classifications Vajrayana, a subcategory of Mahayana, is recognized as a third branch. While Buddhism remains most popular within Asia, both branches are now found throughout the world. Various sources put the number of Buddhists in the world at between 230 million and 500 million, making it the world’s fourth-largest religion.

Buddhist schools vary on the exact nature of the path to liberation, the importance and canonicity of various teachings and scriptures, and especially their respective practices. The foundations of Buddhist tradition and practice are the Three Jewels: the Buddha, the Dharma (the teachings), and the Sangha (the community). Taking “refuge in the triple gem” has traditionally been a declaration and commitment to being on the Buddhist path and in general distinguishes a Buddhist from a non-Buddhist. Other practices may include following ethical precepts, support of the monastic community, renouncing conventional living and becoming a monastic, meditation (this category includes mindfulness), cultivation of higher wisdom and discernment, study of scriptures, devotional practices, ceremonies, and in the Mahayana tradition, invocation of buddhas and bodhisattvas.

According to one analysis, Buddhism is the fourth-largest religion in the world behind Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. The monks’ order (Sangha), which began during the lifetime of the Buddha, is among the oldest organizations on earth.

– Theravāda Buddhism, using Pāli as its scriptural language, is the dominant form of Buddhism in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Sri Lanka, and Burma. The Dalit Buddhist movement in India (inspired by B. R. Ambedkar) also practices Theravada. Approximately 124 million adherents.
– East Asian forms of Mahayana Buddhism that use Chinese scriptures are dominant in most of China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Vietnam as well as such communities within Indochina, Southeast Asia and the West. Approximately 185 million adherents.
– Tibetan Buddhism is found in Tibet, Bhutan, Mongolia, surrounding areas in India, China, Nepal, and the Russian Federation. Approximately 20 million adherents.

Most Buddhist groups in the West are at least nominally affiliated with one of these three traditions.

At the present time, the teachings of all three branches of Buddhism have spread throughout the world, and Buddhist texts are increasingly translated into local languages. While in the West Buddhism is often seen as exotic and progressive, in the East it is regarded as familiar and traditional. Buddhists in Asia are frequently well organized and well funded. In a number of countries, it is recognized as an official religion and receives state support. Modern influences increasingly lead to new forms of Buddhism that significantly depart from traditional beliefs and practices.

Overall there is an overwhelming diversity of recent forms of Buddhism.

Duration : 0:8:35

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A Trip to KPC (Tibetan Buddhist Temple) Part 2

2 A Trip to KPC (Tibetan Buddhist Temple) Part 2http://tara.org

Kunzang Palyul Choling of Maryland
The KPC-Maryland temple is situated on 72 pristine acres in rural Montgomery County, Maryland, just outside Washington, DC.

Every Sunday you can attend an instructional class in various Buddhist meditational practices, in-depth teachings in which the Buddhas wisdom is applied to everyday living, and ongoing classes for new Buddhist practitioners.KPC Maryland often hosts special workshops including training in the Bodhisattva way of life, stabilizing the mind meditation and foundational Buddhist thought. Bodhisattva instruction is also available for pre-teens and teens upon request.

Special empowerments, teachings, and retreats are offered throughout the year by Jetsunma Ahkön Lhamo and visiting teachers. They include such subjects of interest such as instruction in Phowa, the transference of consciousness at the time of death, as well as empowerments to engage in preliminary Buddhist practice.

In the early 1990′s KPC-Maryland acquired 65 acres of unspoiled land adjacent to the temple. Over time, a number of stupas, walking trails and meditation gardens were developed on the land and it is now a beautiful peace park with wonderful walking trails, meditation benches, gardens and 28 consecrated stupas

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Duration : 0:8:34

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Kabbalah Meditation Hindu Buddhist and Christian Rituals and Practices

2 Kabbalah Meditation Hindu Buddhist and Christian Rituals and Practiceshttp://tinyurl.com/meditate21 – SAVE 50% on Meditation Books and CD’s NOW

The 5 Elements Meditation Practice Manual

Most all the cultivation schools of the world say that the human body is composed of 5 elements — an earth, water, wind (chi or prana), fire (kundalini), and space element, and purifying them is the process of internal alchemy. It’s actually possible to cultivate these five separate elements to transform your chi and enter into samadhi. Here’s the full details of these unusual meditation techniques in just 56 pages.

Duration : 0:0:24

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(Part 2) Medicine Buddha, Teachings, Prayers, Mudras

2 (Part 2) Medicine Buddha, Teachings, Prayers, MudrasApril 29, 2008. This was the practice and teaching portion of the Medicine Buddha Empowerment Event held in Orlando, April 28 and 29, 2008 at the home for the Drigung Theksum Chöling or the Orlando Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and Dharma Group. The Drigung Theksum Chöling is a Dharma and Meditation Group which practices both Basic forms of meditation as well as Tibetan (Vajrayana) Buddhist practices. Join us at meditation.meetup.com/558 Visit orlandodharma.org The group was officially consecrated on Febuary 11th, 2007 by our Spiritual Advisor, Drupon Thinley Nyingpo Rinpoche and is under the direction of Konchog Shenphen, the group’s co-founder. The Drigung Kagyu Lineage is one of the Kagyu lineages which was founded 852 years ago, by the great spiritual master, Kyoba Jigten Sumgon.

This is part 2 of the Medicine Buddha teachings which shows the Rimpoche giving detailed instructions on how to perform the mudras (hand gestures) that go with the chanted offerings of the 7 bowls (+ 1 for music) that represent water for drinking (ARGHAM), water for bathing the feet (PADYAM), flowers (PUPE), incense (DUPE), light from a lamp (ALOKE), perfumed water (GHANDE), fresh food (NAIWITE), and music (SHAPTA) in the air.

Duration : 0:8:0

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A Trip to KPC (Tibetan Buddhist Temple) Part 1

2 A Trip to KPC (Tibetan Buddhist Temple) Part 1http://tara.org

Kunzang Palyul Choling of Maryland
The KPC-Maryland temple is situated on 72 pristine acres in rural Montgomery County, Maryland, just outside Washington, DC.

Every Sunday you can attend an instructional class in various Buddhist meditational practices, in-depth teachings in which the Buddhas wisdom is applied to everyday living, and ongoing classes for new Buddhist practitioners.KPC Maryland often hosts special workshops including training in the Bodhisattva way of life, stabilizing the mind meditation and foundational Buddhist thought. Bodhisattva instruction is also available for pre-teens and teens upon request.

Special empowerments, teachings, and retreats are offered throughout the year by Jetsunma Ahkön Lhamo and visiting teachers. They include such subjects of interest such as instruction in Phowa, the transference of consciousness at the time of death, as well as empowerments to engage in preliminary Buddhist practice.

In the early 1990′s KPC-Maryland acquired 65 acres of unspoiled land adjacent to the temple. Over time, a number of stupas, walking trails and meditation gardens were developed on the land and it is now a beautiful peace park with wonderful walking trails, meditation benches, gardens and 28 consecrated stupas

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Duration : 0:4:13

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